Greek translation of Cryo Podia?

Updated on August 6, 2022

In a House episode, Dr. House says “Cryo podia… Green for Duh”… I read somewhere that the actual translation is “cold feet”, is he being sarcastic or does the statement hold any merit? What is the actual translation?

I meant “Greek” for “Duh”… typo.

5 Answers

  • This is a joke that only makes sense in context. In the episode House just accused the patient of faking a fainting spell at the altar during his wedding.

    The patient’s fiancée asks: “Why would he fake anything?”

    House replies “Cryo Podia. That’s Greek for ‘Duh’” Perpetuating a brief ɡɑɡ of translating several Greek medical terms.

    The joke is that both “Cold Feet” and “Duh” could be acceptable answers to her question, implying that the reason for faking is obvious.

  • Podia Definition

  • This Site Might Help You.

    RE:

    Greek translation of Cryo Podia?

    In a House episode, Dr. House says “Cryo podia… Green for Duh”… I read somewhere that the actual translation is “cold feet”, is he being sarcastic or does the statement hold any merit? What is the actual translation?

  • cryo podia does mean cold feet, but i am lost about the green for duh(?)

    edit: again i am not sure about ”Greek for duh”. what’s a ”duh”? is it like for people who don’ understand something bc they are stupid? if it is then he was being sarcastic (as he uses to), bc cold feet are not used as a stupidity measurement in Greek.

    @Stephan, ok i got it now… funny!

    Source(s): native Greek.
  • And it s “Crya podia”

See also  Why is Church’s chicken always in the ghetto?